Objective Eye Tracking at AS4SAN conference in Sydney

Objective Eye Tracking was a Gold Exhibition Partner for this conference. The conference was held at the University of Technology, Sydney.

AS4SAN is an interdisciplinary society devoted to the study of central nervous system mechanisms (e.g. neural, hormonal, cellular, genetic) underlying social and affective behaviour in the context of both normal development and functioning and clinical disorders.

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We were doing demos of the Tobii Glasses 2 as well as other screen mounted eye trackers. We also had a 15 minute presentation slot to talk a bit about how eye trackers work and where they can be used. Thanks to all the professors, students and other delegates who stopped by to say hello and share your ideas.

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Singapore government agencies are embracing the user-centered design process to improve urban living

With the fervent push for Singapore to become a “Smart Nation”, many government agencies are heeding the call to harness technology and user-centered design thinking process to improve urban living. Government agencies such as the Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS) are starting to set up technology research and innovation labs, aiming to “create new opportunities and improve people’s lives”.

At the forefront of the movement is Singapore’s Government Digital Services (GDS) that is headquartered in the newly launched 13,000 sq ft creative space, IDA Hive, equipped with a Tobii Pro X2-30 screen-based eye tracker. GDS has been in operation for more than 2 years, and the team has developed and launched several apps such as the Singapore Civil Defence Force’s myResponder, the Ministry of National Development’s OneService, Department of Statistics Singapore’s SingStat, as well as the mobile app for the demand-driven, shared transit experiment, Beeline.

GDS also provides consultancy services for other government agencies in developing or enhancing a digital service. For instance, Design Experience lab is a research facility in IDA Hive, where end users are brought in to test the digital service. The objective behind directly studying how users physically interact with the digital services is to better understand the needs and pain points experienced by users. This user-centered approach to design not only provides improvements for the product/services in development, but also insights into experience design for future product/services.

GDS recently engaged Objective Experience in a couple of such usability testing sessions for a new iteration of the IRAS (Inland Revenue Authority of Singapore)’s website with the use of Tobii Pro X2-30 screen-based eye tracker. With the eye trackers, researchers are able to see exactly at which touch points users are having troubles with, and which elements are capturing or not capturing users’ attention. Coupled with the Retrospective Think Aloud (RTA) research methodology where users are interviewed with the cue of the eye tracking video, researchers are able to obtain more reliable accounts of what users are experiencing while interacting with the product/services. This method reduces the risk of fabrications as well as research bias.

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Improvement to the IRAS website were made after one round of usability testing, and were validated with the next. GDS was very receptive to the user-centered design process, and quite a number of recommendations from the first round of testing were implemented. GDS was fervently concerned with making the IRAS website more user friendly for the wider audience (individual, companies, younger and older tax filers alike), and the overall result from the several rounds of usability testing certainly reflects that. For instance, GDS understands the prevalence of mobile computing, and put much attention into redesigning the mobile version of the website. In all, the project saw more favourable feedbacks from end users.

Tobii X2-30 eye tracker on left screen

 

Objective Experience has also collaborated with the Ministry of Manpower (MOM) on several usability testing projects with eye tracking for print collaterals as well as for their website, and the research had certainly led to design reiterations with improved user experience.

With the newly found support for user-centered design process and digital innovation from the Singapore government, the UX community is poised to get bigger and better. And if the UX community gets bigger and better with the support from the government, you know our quality of life is definitely improving.

For more information on how Objective Experience can help improve the lives of your customers, feel free to drop us a comment, or contact our Chief Experience Officer, James, for a chat.

 

 

Are you using eye tracking as a differentiator in your marketing?

Edith Conan University in Perth is! In psychology, Dr. Shane Rogers and his honours students are using 2 pairs of Tobii Pro Glasses 2 in a unique and exciting way, to understand how two people interact with each other.

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Using the eye tracking research methodology is such a novel and exciting way to conduct psychology research that the marketing department of ECU has caught on and used it to promote the psych course. Check out their awesome marketing campaign below!

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New marketing campaign by ECU, featuring the Tobii Pro Glasses 2

Stay tuned! As Shane will be sharing his research with us as it progresses!

P.S Check out how ECU has used the Tobii Pro Glasses 2 in a previous research study investigating the similarities and differences on the Aboriginal Australians ways of seeing the world to non-Aboriginal ways.

Visa uses Tobii Pro Glasses 2 for customer insight

As contactless payment is getting more prevalent, Visa wanted to do a health check on the payment experience to ensure that customers can use their credit or debit cards to pay for their items seamlessly. They commissioned Objective Experience to conduct a study focusing on what customers pay attention to during the payment process of using Visa payWave, including branding on the card, at the merchant checkout and POS (point-of-sale) communications.

logo-visa-everywhere.pngVisa payWave is Visa’s contactless payment technology. It facilitates fast and convenient transactions at the point of sale and eliminates the requirement for a consumer to make physical contact with the terminal when making a purchase (therefore “contactless”).

The study was conducted in both Singapore and Sydney (8 participants per location) at well-known supermarkets like Cold Storage and Woolworths. The Tobii Pro Glasses 2 was fitted onto the 16 pre-recruited supermarket shoppers between 21 to 54 years of age. Participants were instructed to shop for any items they would like to purchase, but had to use the selected Visa payWave credit card to pay.

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Contactless payment in a supermarket in Singapore

The lightweight recording unit of the Tobii Pro Glasses 2 and the simple, fast calibration made the data collection process easy and smooth. The adaptability of the Glasses 2 allowed the research to be set up and conducted anywhere (even in a busy café just outside of each supermarket). This wearable eye tracker is best used to study human behavior in naturalistic environments.

After the participants have finished with their shopping and payment task, the video recording of their task was replayed back to them on the spot with the researcher interviewing them about their payment journey based on what the participants saw and did (Retrospective Think Aloud).

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Contactless payment in a supermarket in Sydney, Australia

 

Through this study, we found several similarities between how customers in Singapore and Sydney pay with the Visa payWave. It helped Visa gained insights into how people use contactless payment via different types of payment terminals, and what they really pay attention to when they are at the checkout counters. Customers generally pre-decide on their payment method even before they start shopping and rarely change their mind halfway through their shopping, but the need for, and relevance of visual prompts varied between customers.Tobii_Pro_Glasses2_3200x1280.jpg

This led to the rethinking of how to best design consumer messaging can be designed at checkouts and entrances to strengthen consumers’ association of Visa and contactless payment, as well as for bank partners to advertise their service offerings.

Would you like to try out eye tracking on your customers? Drop an email to infosg@objectiveexperience.com or call us at +65 67374511

Eye Tracking the Future – Mixed Reality

Following our previous blog post on the Virtual Reality, we are taking a step ahead to explore Mixed Reality (MR, sometimes also known as Hybrid Reality).

What is Mixed Reality (MR)?

Essentially, MR refers to the merging of both real and virtual reality to create an environment which enables physical and virtual objects to co-exist and interact in real time. Traditional MR has been the main driver for Simulation-based Learning (s-learning), whereby it is used to train apprentices in technical domain, often involving high real-world risk, such as medical procedures, pilot training and military training. MR allows substantial replication of certain aspects of the real world, thus providing a safe, yet realistic, environment to acquire the necessary skills that would be otherwise difficult to acquire in real world settings. If by any chance that you are confused by what is VR, AR (Augmented Reality) & MR, click here (or here) to untangle yourself from the technology jargons.

Current state and the future of MR

Thanks to the publicity and accessibility of current VR technology (notably cheaper and lighter VR Head Mounted Display (HMD) such as the Oculus Rift), MR has been gaining more public attention, as it can provide a more realistic immersive virtual environment than just VR alone. Building on the advantage of using MR in skills learning and findings from scientific research, technology companies has been building “mixed reality classroom” systems (see this article also) to penetrate the rapidly growing EdTech market. Other than learning, MR would also inevitably be the next big platform in the video-gaming industry, which was projected to be the largest market for MR in the next 10 years by Goldman Sachs. The more interesting potential for MR actually lies in the workplace setting, in which Microsoft and Object Theory are working together to build an MR system with the HoloLens for business-related remote collaboration. This not only marks the start of a new form of communication, but also a new form of workplace in the future.

Eye Tracking & MR

Eye tracking is one of the most important research tool that is used in researching driving behaviours and identifying potential hazards that would affect driving safety. Coupled with driving simulators, an eye tracking study can help to study driving behaviours (e.g., visual scan patterns, hazard perception) in risky situations which are impossible to assess safely in real world driving study. Eye tracking in driving simulator studies can also be used as an objective form of comparison with real world driving, enabling designers and engineers of the simulator system to assess whether the driving in the particular simulator indeed resembles real world driving, and whether simulator training indeed translates to real world benefits.

Likewise, eyetracking can be incorporated into other forms of MR simulators easily to help study human behaviours in other potentially hazardous situations. Below are some other examples where eye tracking is used in simulators for various other domains.

Pilot Training Simulator

Flight Control Simulator

Retail Environment Simulator

With the advent of new MR technology and systems, eye tracking can be a powerful tool that can be easily incorporated not just for scientific and market research but also to offer insights into system improvements for better experience.

As you may have known from reading the articles in our blog, eye tracking can be used in a wide variety of research. Check out Tobii Pro’s youtube channel, or continue reading our articles on this blog for more ways you can put your eye-trackers to good use!

If you are interested in how eye tracking can help you and your business, drop us a line at infosg@objectiveexperience.com or +65 67374511. The Future is Now.

 

The Eye Tracking way: a new training and assessment method

“Many traditional assessment strategies in medical education rely on tabulating learners’ scores in order to obtain grades,” says Dr. Szulewski (Queen’s University Professor, Emergency Medicine). “In the real world, medical learners are faced with the need to make many decisions in a short time period, which increases their cognitive load and puts a strain on working memory. We have shown that we can now measure cognitive load in an unobtrusive way during medical assessments.”

There has been increasing interest in using alternative methods to teach and assess medical students and young doctors. Is there a better way to show medical students what exactly they need to look out for when diagnosing a patient or conducting a surgery other than diagrams and auditory listening? Written and practical examinations also have its shortfalls, especially since the actual working environment these future doctors will work in are high-pressured and the decision-making process differs when they are in a high-pressured setting versus an examination laboratory in a university.

Already there are some educators looking towards eye tracking as a tool to help teach medical subjects and assess students with. How is that done?

Visual learning

Educators are able to easily show visually by way of videos that contain eye tracking gaze data what students are supposed to see and do. Students can observe, mimic, and adapt what their educators do much more easily this way than compared to educators describing their techniques by finger-pointing.

Novice versus Experienced

Assessment is a major component in any form of learning. Eye tracking metrics can be used to assess who is a novice practitioner and who is more experienced. In the University of Arizona, Krupinski et al. (2006) have tried using eye tracking on light microscopy for diagnostic pathology and found differences between fully trained pathologists and medical students/residents. Others have also tested the usage of eye tracking to assess surgical skills (e.g. Lee et al., 2010; Zheng, Jiang & Atkins, 2015), abnormalities search on radiographs (e.g. Turgeon & Lam, 2016), ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia (UGRA) (e.g., Harrison et al., 2016) and even optic disc examinations (e.g. O’Neill et al., 2011). As research progresses, algorithms can be developed to assess medical students’ performance in their diagnostic and even surgical tasks. Having a quantifiable tool to assess expertise can be a useful in comparing educational interventions, which can potentially improve the rate at which students developed expertise.

The potential of eye tracking being established as a valid and reliable method of teaching and assessment grows as more research is being done in this area. With products like the Tobii Pro Glasses 2, this method becomes increasingly accessible in a natural environment.
The future of education is here.

Tracking the Shopping Experience

It’s so awesome to see how eye tracking is being used by so many people!

A group of Industrial Design students from Nanyang Polytechnic had the opportunity to use the Tobii Pro Glasses 2 to research how people shop at Scanteak, a furniture store in Singapore. For an experience design class, the students wanted to understand how people navigate through the store, and how they go about finding products within the store.

Using eye tracking, they were able to capture video data of where people went to within the store and what people looked at and did exactly.

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Nanyang Polytechnic students involved with this eye tracking project assignment.