Our favourite read: Eye Tracking the User Experience: A Practical Guide to Research by Aga Bojko

Among all the books that discuss about eye-tracking and user experience, our personal favourite has to be:

eye-tracking-the-user-experience

Eye Tracking the User Experience

A Practical Guide to Research

By Aga Bojko

As you might have expected, this book will teach readers how to do eye-tracking studies the right way, choosing the right device, analysing and presenting the right way, and so on and so forth…..Yes, it virtually covers every aspect of what you need to know and consider before adding eye-tracking to your research toolkit.

Richly illustrated and clearly witten, this book stands apart from similar books in that it presents information in an approachable and accessible way. Despite all the technical bits, reading it certainly did not give us the feelings of reading a textbook!

 

However, the main reason why we like this book is the main theme that runs throughout the book: “Think first, Track later”. Aga Bokjo advocates that eye-tracking will not always be the most appropriate research methodology, unless the data it generates can be used to answer particular research objectives. Check out an excerpt for the book here.

By being brutally honest about the real benefits and limitations of eye-tracking, this book offers a refreshing take on the controversial research method. Coming from a background that blends rigorous academic research with an abundance of UX industry experience, Aga Bokjo gives us “actionable insights” and guidance to adopting (or not) the eye-tracking research methodology. Because of the scientific rigour that Aga Bokjo tries to instill in readers, this book appeals not only to the UX industry, but to the academic world as well.

Do you want to find out how eye tracking can help your research? Do drop by Objective Experience and pick up a copy of the book. Alternatively drop us an email at info@objectiveexperience.com for a knowledge sharing session.

We’re saving the Planet! Objective Eye Tracking and Prof. Gemma Calvert secure a grant from The Institute on Asian Consumer Insight!

We are proud and excited to announce that Objective Eye Tracking is collaborating with Prof. Gemma Calvert and her team of researchers at Nanyang Technological University on a grant project awarded by The Institute on Asian Consumer Insight (ACI).

This ground breaking research project will seek to understand Asian consumers’ sustainable living perceptions and how that translates into their shopping behaviors. The project tackles key strategic topics under the Possible Future Worlds research initiative at ACI. The mission for this project is to better understand how we can reduce the impact that humans have on Planet Earth.

We will probe into the consumers’ subconscious attitudes and emotions about sustainability, recycling and eco-shopping using cutting edge methods including the Implicit Reaction Time tests and Eye Tracking with the Tobii Pro Glasses 2. These methods will help us uncover new insights that are not easily accessible via regular self-report measures and derive new solutions that will help change human behavior and make a difference.

 

About ACI (The Institute on Asian Consumer Insight)

aciACI was created to help international brands understand Asian consumers and develop business strategies to succeed in Asian markets. By applying the latest market research methods, including psychometrics, biometrics and data-driven approaches, we tap into the deep-seated cross-cultural and often subconscious influences on consumers behavior so that our clients can predict their responses across different Asian markets. ACI also conducts and sponsors research on all aspects of Asian life and disseminates many of these findings on their web-based knowledge platform, Insight+.  For more details about ACI, how we can help your company to better understand your target Asian audience, or find out more about our educational programs, please visit us at ww.aci-institute.com.

ACI is a joint initiative between the Singapore Economic Development Board (EDB) and Nanyang Technological University (NTU) and is hosted at NTU.

About Objective Eye Tracking

oetObjective Eye Tracking are the leaders in Eye Tracking in the Asia Pacific Region. We sell and rent Tobii Eye Trackers to universities, market research agencies, corporates, UX and usability companies across South East Asia, Australia and New Zealand.  We have a team of passionate Customer Experience Consultants who aim to improve the experience of a brand, across every touch point (both online and offline), and are the leaders in using eye tracking technology to uncover unconscious insights which can be used to improve the customer experience.

Video Highlights from Understanding Human Behavior with Eye Tracking workshop

The Understanding Human Behavior with Eye Tracking workshop was held in the Institute on Asian Consumer Insight (ACI) in Nanyang School of Business (Nanyang Technological University) on 21 March 2016. Check out the highlights in the videos below! We’ve also included the interviews with the individual speakers had with our CEO and ACI Fellow, James Breeze.

Three speakers (Dr. Adam Roberts, Haojiang Ying, and Shannon Chia) spoke about how people navigated in indoor environments using certain architectural cues, how people paid covert attention to and perceived emotions with limited facial information, and what athletes paid attention to while playing their sport (badminton) when compared to novices.

Interview with Dr. Adam Roberts

Interview with Ying Haojiang

Interview with Shannon Chia

Eye Tracking the Future – Mixed Reality

Following our previous blog post on the Virtual Reality, we are taking a step ahead to explore Mixed Reality (MR, sometimes also known as Hybrid Reality).

What is Mixed Reality (MR)?

Essentially, MR refers to the merging of both real and virtual reality to create an environment which enables physical and virtual objects to co-exist and interact in real time. Traditional MR has been the main driver for Simulation-based Learning (s-learning), whereby it is used to train apprentices in technical domain, often involving high real-world risk, such as medical procedures, pilot training and military training. MR allows substantial replication of certain aspects of the real world, thus providing a safe, yet realistic, environment to acquire the necessary skills that would be otherwise difficult to acquire in real world settings. If by any chance that you are confused by what is VR, AR (Augmented Reality) & MR, click here (or here) to untangle yourself from the technology jargons.

Current state and the future of MR

Thanks to the publicity and accessibility of current VR technology (notably cheaper and lighter VR Head Mounted Display (HMD) such as the Oculus Rift), MR has been gaining more public attention, as it can provide a more realistic immersive virtual environment than just VR alone. Building on the advantage of using MR in skills learning and findings from scientific research, technology companies has been building “mixed reality classroom” systems (see this article also) to penetrate the rapidly growing EdTech market. Other than learning, MR would also inevitably be the next big platform in the video-gaming industry, which was projected to be the largest market for MR in the next 10 years by Goldman Sachs. The more interesting potential for MR actually lies in the workplace setting, in which Microsoft and Object Theory are working together to build an MR system with the HoloLens for business-related remote collaboration. This not only marks the start of a new form of communication, but also a new form of workplace in the future.

Eye Tracking & MR

Eye tracking is one of the most important research tool that is used in researching driving behaviours and identifying potential hazards that would affect driving safety. Coupled with driving simulators, an eye tracking study can help to study driving behaviours (e.g., visual scan patterns, hazard perception) in risky situations which are impossible to assess safely in real world driving study. Eye tracking in driving simulator studies can also be used as an objective form of comparison with real world driving, enabling designers and engineers of the simulator system to assess whether the driving in the particular simulator indeed resembles real world driving, and whether simulator training indeed translates to real world benefits.

Likewise, eyetracking can be incorporated into other forms of MR simulators easily to help study human behaviours in other potentially hazardous situations. Below are some other examples where eye tracking is used in simulators for various other domains.

Pilot Training Simulator

Flight Control Simulator

Retail Environment Simulator

With the advent of new MR technology and systems, eye tracking can be a powerful tool that can be easily incorporated not just for scientific and market research but also to offer insights into system improvements for better experience.

As you may have known from reading the articles in our blog, eye tracking can be used in a wide variety of research. Check out Tobii Pro’s youtube channel, or continue reading our articles on this blog for more ways you can put your eye-trackers to good use!

If you are interested in how eye tracking can help you and your business, drop us a line at infosg@objectiveexperience.com or +65 67374511. The Future is Now.

 

Thank you to everyone who attended the Eye Tracking workshop and discussion

Thank you to everyone who attended the Understanding Human Behavior with Eye Tracking workshop held at the Institute on Asian Consumer Insight (ACI) in Nanyang School of Business (Nanyang Technological University). We heard from a variety of speakers (Dr. Adam Roberts, Haojiang Ying, and Shannon Chia) about how people navigated in indoor environments using certain architectural cues, how people paid covert attention to and perceived emotions with limited facial information, and what athletes paid attention to while playing their sport (badminton) when compared to novices.

Everyone then shared and discussed about eye tracking methodologies, ethical issues, capabilities of the devices, and research ideas. We hope everyone learnt something here, because we at OE certainly did!

ACI-OET

Major thanks to Prof. Gemma Calvert and Samantha Wan in ACI for their efforts in putting this event together.

The event was captured on video! Stay tuned, we’ll share that very soon!

“Science has never looked so sexy”

 

Is love in the eyes of the beholder?

On a recent episode of ABC’s The Bachelor, the Tobii Pro Glasses 2 was used in a social experiment to test the love and compatibility between the newest Bachelor, software salesman Ben Higgins, and the several ladies competing for his attention.

Will he find true love this time round? The episode was aired on Monday, January 11th, 2016, at 8/7c on ABC. Read more about how they used the Tobii Pro Glasses 2 here!

 

The Emergence of a New Medium – VR and its UX considerations

A very Happy New Year from everyone here at Objective Experience! Hope you guys had a wonderful 2015, and continue to stay awesome. Let’s share the joy and love to everyone by making the world a better place every day and aim towards an even better 2016!

In 2015 we have seen some interesting new trends happening in the technology and UX scene. Notably, we see the emergence of a familiar medium that we are so used to see in science fiction movies – Virtual Reality (VR). Although VR has been around for quite some time now, it was a niche technology that were mostly used as a research tool, as it has been far too expensive and bulky to enter the mainstream market.

In the consumer market arena, Samsung has already announced their new Samsung Gear VR and its corresponding lineup of games and apps, however many are still unaware that VR indeed exists because they have not been educated on it. VR is predicted to be pushed into widespread adoption via the gaming industry, with Sony spearheading the charge. Facebook’s acquisition of Oculus last year could also probably mark the start of an era where VR could replace many of our real-world interactions.  VR could very well be the next computing platform, akin to how smartphones is starting to replace our desktop/laptop computers, as well as change how we live our lives over the last decade.

With the possibility that VR will become the next computing platform that will become increasingly prevalent and integrated into our lives, it seems that the UX community needs to get acquainted with this new medium, because it is our job and passion to make interactive experiences pleasurable. 2016 is poised to be an exciting year for VR, and UX designers can expect to have projects working on the VR medium.

2388290.png

Source: Back To The Future Part 2 (1989)

As the medium is still relatively new, it could be still quite difficult to find good resources on the internet, but fret not, Github user omgmog (Max Glenister) has compiled a really comprehensive list of resources (to date) on UI/UX design considerations for VR. Below is the 3 fundamental UX considerations that is important for a pleasurable VR experience:

1. Immersion / Presence – Perhaps the most important concept that is associated with the UX of VR is “immersion” (or “presence”), so much so that design on the VR platform has been coined “immersive design”. Basically, “immersion” is the extent on how the virtual environment faithfully reproduces experiences in which users believe that the virtual environment is physically real. There are many factors that can “break” immersion, for example, if interaction with a virtual object does not result in any effects, it violates our mental model for object interaction and hence breaking immersion. Unrealistic positional sound effects and model details would also make the object interaction seem less realistic.

 

2. Spatial Disorientation / Virtual Reality Sickness – Research has shown that virtual reality sickness is a major barrier to using VR. The cause behind Virtual Reality Sickness is still not fully known yet, but sensory conflict during movement seems to be the primary cause. In natural navigation, we use a few of our senses in tandem to makes sense of the environment, especially the eyes and the ears. However in VR, this job become primarily subserved by your eyes. The mismatch from the information going into your eyes and the other of your senses creates discomfort and symptoms that are similar to motion sickness. However, the solution to this apparently inherent problem to the VR platform can be as simple as adding virtual noise or twerking virtual reality motion parameters.

 

3. Comfort – Although comfort mainly depends on the hardware design, the design of the software applications contribute to comfort as well. For example, physical movements should be consistent with human ergonomics. If a particular action forces an unnatural twist to the body (e.g., overturning your head while sitting still), it is uncomfortable and can be potentially dangerous. Illegible text (which is pretty common in VR) and overly bright scenes will also impose additional stress on the eyes, causing eye fatigue.

Other than putting the focus on assessing the UX for VR applications, VR can also be a useful tool for general UX research. As mentioned above, VR technology started out mainly as a research tool, thanks to fact that it can handle research that requires ecological validity in a controlled environment. Before VR existed, many research are conducted in a lab-based setting which cannot really be generalized to the “real-world”. With VR, you can attain both criteria by constructing an artificial environment resembling the real-world within a controlled environment. With this in mind, undoubtedly VR can also be useful for UX and market research, specifically in assessing user experience in an unbiased, controlled setting.

VR can also be combined with eye tracking technology to provide more ecological-valid insights to UX research. For example, Tobii Pro offers VR integration with the Tobii Pro Glasses 2, providing an easy way to combine both VR and eye tracking technology into a powerful research tool.

Click here for more details!