Seeing into Screens- Eye tracking and the moving image

Seeing into Screens- Eye tracking and the moving image is now out through Bloomsbury.

The book is a project coming out of the Eye Tracking the Moving Image (ETMI) research group that was set up in late 2013 by Jodi Sita and Sean Redmond. Their aim was to bring together a group of researchers from different disciplines to examine gaze behaviour on screen using eye tracking. The group, mostly compromised of Melbourne based researchers in both the arts and the sciences,  grew out of a desire to foster collaborations between the arts and (neuro)sciences to explore how eye tracking could be of use to the analysis of film scholarship. This is outlined in How We Came To Eye Tracking Animation: A Cross-Disciplinary Approach to Researching the Moving Image.

This new book, Seeing into Screens, grew directly out of these collaborations and was edited by 4 members of the ETMI group; Tessa Dwyer, Claire Perkins, Sean Redmond and Jodi Sita.  In Seeing into Screens,the collection focuses on work collected from eye tracking studies while watching the big screen and is analysed to assess what viewers dwell upon as well as what areas are left untouched. The book includes chapters by Jonathan Batten & Tim J. Smith, a well-known eye tracking researcher, as well as contributions from Paul Atkinson, William Brown, Stephen Doherty & Jan-Louis Kruger, Tessa Dwyer & Claire Perkins, Wendy Fox, Lauren Henderson, Jared Orth, Pablo Romero-Fresco, Sarah Thomas, Adam Qureshi & Amy Bell,  Ann-Kristin Wallengren & Alexander Strukelj and from the founders of ETMI; Sean Redmond & Jodi Sita

In addition ETMI work has been published in a special edition of the online journal Refractory(#25, 2015), a special issue of the visual journal [In]Transition- The Poetics of Eye Tracking (2017) and also in a recently published collection Making Sense of Cinema: Empirical Studies into Film Spectators and Spectatorship (2017); Edited by CarrieLynn Reinhard and Christopher Olson.

Members of the group continue to work on cross-disciplinary projects, from examining children watching animation to experimental work with sound and movement, to the influences of subtitles and narrative. This new book is an important contribution by this group and in the field of eye tracking in general.

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SEANES 2016 – Bandung, Indonesia

On 28 Nov to 1 Dec 2016, Objective Eye Tracking attended the 4th SEANES International Conference on Human Factors and Ergonomics in South-East Asia in Bandung, Indonesia.


Ying Ki, our very own eye-tracking research consultant, was on the centre-stage, describing how eye-tracking research can help us uncover in-depth insights that are not easily accessible via regular methods in Human Factors and Ergonomics research.

Eye-tracking is particularly important in Human Factors and Ergonomics research, for example in driving research, where safety and accident prevention are of utmost significance.

In terms of attention, the human’s dominant sense is vision. More often than not, our sense of sight contributes to the majority of our conscious awareness.

However, what might be surprising to you is that even our attention and decision making processes are influenced by our unconscious visual inputs.

This neuro-cognitive mechanism is something that visual and interaction designers adopt to improve conversion. Our consulting company arm, Objective Experience,  takes into consideration this mechanism when conducting any user testing and has always been educating the user experience industry in Australia and Singapore about this.

The Tobii Pro Glasses 2 was also showcased during the presentation, and it generated a huge amount of interest among the audience. With a wearable eye tracker like the Tobii Pro Glasses 2, human factors and ergonomics research can be conveniently conducted in naturalistic environments. This is essential to understand how our visual inputs affect our behaviour and decision making in real world conditions, and not just in lab settings.TobiiPro_Glasses_2_Eye_Tracker_side_3_1.jpg

Do you want to find out how eye tracking can help your research? Drop us an email at to arrange a demonstration session.