Seeing into Screens- Eye tracking and the moving image

Seeing into Screens- Eye tracking and the moving image is now out through Bloomsbury.

The book is a project coming out of the Eye Tracking the Moving Image (ETMI) research group that was set up in late 2013 by Jodi Sita and Sean Redmond. Their aim was to bring together a group of researchers from different disciplines to examine gaze behaviour on screen using eye tracking. The group, mostly compromised of Melbourne based researchers in both the arts and the sciences,  grew out of a desire to foster collaborations between the arts and (neuro)sciences to explore how eye tracking could be of use to the analysis of film scholarship. This is outlined in How We Came To Eye Tracking Animation: A Cross-Disciplinary Approach to Researching the Moving Image.

This new book, Seeing into Screens, grew directly out of these collaborations and was edited by 4 members of the ETMI group; Tessa Dwyer, Claire Perkins, Sean Redmond and Jodi Sita.  In Seeing into Screens,the collection focuses on work collected from eye tracking studies while watching the big screen and is analysed to assess what viewers dwell upon as well as what areas are left untouched. The book includes chapters by Jonathan Batten & Tim J. Smith, a well-known eye tracking researcher, as well as contributions from Paul Atkinson, William Brown, Stephen Doherty & Jan-Louis Kruger, Tessa Dwyer & Claire Perkins, Wendy Fox, Lauren Henderson, Jared Orth, Pablo Romero-Fresco, Sarah Thomas, Adam Qureshi & Amy Bell,  Ann-Kristin Wallengren & Alexander Strukelj and from the founders of ETMI; Sean Redmond & Jodi Sita

In addition ETMI work has been published in a special edition of the online journal Refractory(#25, 2015), a special issue of the visual journal [In]Transition- The Poetics of Eye Tracking (2017) and also in a recently published collection Making Sense of Cinema: Empirical Studies into Film Spectators and Spectatorship (2017); Edited by CarrieLynn Reinhard and Christopher Olson.

Members of the group continue to work on cross-disciplinary projects, from examining children watching animation to experimental work with sound and movement, to the influences of subtitles and narrative. This new book is an important contribution by this group and in the field of eye tracking in general.

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Advanced topics in eye tracking: Classification of eye movements

Daniel Scheffold, a Tobii Certified Instructor from Tobii Pro has started a 4-part series of advanced topics in eye tracking.logo_pro

Check it out below!

This is the first part of four in our mini-series on advanced topics in eye tracking. We begin with a topic that is fundamental to the technique: classification of eye movements.
Why do we need to classify eye movements in the first place?
Most modern eye trackers are video-based. Images of the eye captured at regular intervals, the sampling rate, are processed to calculate instantaneous gaze position. This discrete data stream must then be converted back to the informative, continuous eye movements for analysis. This digital-to-analog conversion is accomplished by passing the raw gaze samples through an event detection algorithm called the fixation filter.
Fixation filters can come with adjustable parameters to enable tailoring their characteristics to specific circumstances. Choosing the appropriate parameters is of fundamental importance in properly classifying eye movements and calculating valid metrics based on the resulting fixations and saccades.

How do I apply it?
There are a variety of fixation filters and researchers may choose based on those commonly used in their field. If using Tobii Pro Studio for analysis, you can choose from several with varying levels of complexity and adjustability.
The Tobii Pro Studio default is the Tobii I-VT fixation filter. As a classification filter that operates on the velocity of eye movement, it is effective and commonly used in human behavior research.
You can find the algorithm description here: Download White Paper: Tobii I-VT Fixation Filter

Tip: As reviewers get more demanding and want to understand better how you processed your data, we encourage you to cite this White Paper and the parameters chosen in your methodology section if you use this filter.

Our White Paper on the Default Values Tobii I-VT Filter describes how we determined the optimal parameter values of the Tobii I-VT Fixation Filter.

As this is a generic eye movement filter, it is reasonable to review and validate the parameters of your eye movement filter empirically. You find a great hands-on guide for this is in Chapter 5.3, pp. 153 in “Eye Tracking – A Comprehensive Guide to Methods and Measures” from Holmqvist & Nyström et al. (Oxford University Press, 2011). In Tobii Pro Studio, the Velocity Chart can aid you in this process (see Tobii Pro Studio manual Appendix 14.2)

To summarize, how you classify eye movements in your data is an extremely important step in your research and can have a massive influence on the calculated measures, so choose carefully.

Recommended reading:
Chapter 5, Estimating Oculomotor Events from Raw Data Samples, Holmqvist & Nyström et al., 2011.

If you’d like to learn the basics of eye movements and events (e.g. what are fixations, saccades, smooth pursuit, vergence, VOR), we touched base on it in this article here.

Next up…we will be taking a deeper look at the three different spaces used in eye tracking and how they relate to drawing areas-of-interest. Watch out for the article on!

Objective Experience speaks at Agile Singapore Conference 2016

Join our senior eye-tracking consultant, Lynette Goh, at the Agile Singapore Conference 2016, for a talk on using eye-tracking in Agile testing environments.

Eyes are the windows to our souls: how eye tracking aids UX in agile environments

Date: Tuesday, October 6

Time: 11:30am – 12:15pm

Venue: Hotel Fort Canning

For more details on the event, visit here for the full list of talks/activities you can attend at the conference.

Our favourite read: Eye Tracking the User Experience: A Practical Guide to Research by Aga Bojko

Among all the books that discuss about eye-tracking and user experience, our personal favourite has to be:


Eye Tracking the User Experience

A Practical Guide to Research

By Aga Bojko

As you might have expected, this book will teach readers how to do eye-tracking studies the right way, choosing the right device, analysing and presenting the right way, and so on and so forth…..Yes, it virtually covers every aspect of what you need to know and consider before adding eye-tracking to your research toolkit.

Richly illustrated and clearly witten, this book stands apart from similar books in that it presents information in an approachable and accessible way. Despite all the technical bits, reading it certainly did not give us the feelings of reading a textbook!


However, the main reason why we like this book is the main theme that runs throughout the book: “Think first, Track later”. Aga Bokjo advocates that eye-tracking will not always be the most appropriate research methodology, unless the data it generates can be used to answer particular research objectives. Check out an excerpt for the book here.

By being brutally honest about the real benefits and limitations of eye-tracking, this book offers a refreshing take on the controversial research method. Coming from a background that blends rigorous academic research with an abundance of UX industry experience, Aga Bokjo gives us “actionable insights” and guidance to adopting (or not) the eye-tracking research methodology. Because of the scientific rigour that Aga Bokjo tries to instill in readers, this book appeals not only to the UX industry, but to the academic world as well.

Do you want to find out how eye tracking can help your research? Do drop by Objective Experience and pick up a copy of the book. Alternatively drop us an email at for a knowledge sharing session.

Monash University’s Department of Marketing to Host Eye Tracking Research Interest Group Meeting

Do you have an interest in eye tracking and behavioural research?

Join esteemed speakers from Monash University at their (interdisciplinary) eye-tracking research interest group meeting on Friday 2 September, hosted by the Department of Marketing. The aim is to present and discuss current eye tracking research and help generate a research agenda.


Panel of Speakers (left to right):

  1. Dr Kristian Rotaru (Department of Accounting)
  2. Professor Kyle Murray (Department of Marketing)
  3. Dr Dominic Thomas (Department of Marketing)

The topic of discussion will be on how to make sense of pupil dilation data. Pupil dilations are proxy measures of arousal. This session will present and discuss issues encountered and exploratory findings from two projects that use pupil dilation data extracted from eye-tracking recordings.

Date: Friday, September 2

Time: 2:30-4:30pm

Venue: Monash University, Building S, Level 3, Ramler Room, 26 Sir John Monash Drive, Caulfield East 3145

To RSVP, please fill out this form by close of business, Thursday 1 September.
Please remember to sign the attendance list when you arrive at the event.

Click here to check if you have already RSVPed.
If you can no longer attend, please update your RSVP here.

For any further queries, please email

Objective Eye Tracking at AS4SAN conference in Sydney

Objective Eye Tracking was a Gold Exhibition Partner for this conference. The conference was held at the University of Technology, Sydney.

AS4SAN is an interdisciplinary society devoted to the study of central nervous system mechanisms (e.g. neural, hormonal, cellular, genetic) underlying social and affective behaviour in the context of both normal development and functioning and clinical disorders.


We were doing demos of the Tobii Glasses 2 as well as other screen mounted eye trackers. We also had a 15 minute presentation slot to talk a bit about how eye trackers work and where they can be used. Thanks to all the professors, students and other delegates who stopped by to say hello and share your ideas.

IMG_20160623_111759 IMG_20160624_090732

Video Highlights from Understanding Human Behavior with Eye Tracking workshop

The Understanding Human Behavior with Eye Tracking workshop was held in the Institute on Asian Consumer Insight (ACI) in Nanyang School of Business (Nanyang Technological University) on 21 March 2016. Check out the highlights in the videos below! We’ve also included the interviews with the individual speakers had with our CEO and ACI Fellow, James Breeze.

Three speakers (Dr. Adam Roberts, Haojiang Ying, and Shannon Chia) spoke about how people navigated in indoor environments using certain architectural cues, how people paid covert attention to and perceived emotions with limited facial information, and what athletes paid attention to while playing their sport (badminton) when compared to novices.

Interview with Dr. Adam Roberts

Interview with Ying Haojiang

Interview with Shannon Chia