Eye Tracking the Future – Mixed Reality

Following our previous blog post on the Virtual Reality, we are taking a step ahead to explore Mixed Reality (MR, sometimes also known as Hybrid Reality).

What is Mixed Reality (MR)?

Essentially, MR refers to the merging of both real and virtual reality to create an environment which enables physical and virtual objects to co-exist and interact in real time. Traditional MR has been the main driver for Simulation-based Learning (s-learning), whereby it is used to train apprentices in technical domain, often involving high real-world risk, such as medical procedures, pilot training and military training. MR allows substantial replication of certain aspects of the real world, thus providing a safe, yet realistic, environment to acquire the necessary skills that would be otherwise difficult to acquire in real world settings. If by any chance that you are confused by what is VR, AR (Augmented Reality) & MR, click here (or here) to untangle yourself from the technology jargons.

Current state and the future of MR

Thanks to the publicity and accessibility of current VR technology (notably cheaper and lighter VR Head Mounted Display (HMD) such as the Oculus Rift), MR has been gaining more public attention, as it can provide a more realistic immersive virtual environment than just VR alone. Building on the advantage of using MR in skills learning and findings from scientific research, technology companies has been building “mixed reality classroom” systems (see this article also) to penetrate the rapidly growing EdTech market. Other than learning, MR would also inevitably be the next big platform in the video-gaming industry, which was projected to be the largest market for MR in the next 10 years by Goldman Sachs. The more interesting potential for MR actually lies in the workplace setting, in which Microsoft and Object Theory are working together to build an MR system with the HoloLens for business-related remote collaboration. This not only marks the start of a new form of communication, but also a new form of workplace in the future.

Eye Tracking & MR

Eye tracking is one of the most important research tool that is used in researching driving behaviours and identifying potential hazards that would affect driving safety. Coupled with driving simulators, an eye tracking study can help to study driving behaviours (e.g., visual scan patterns, hazard perception) in risky situations which are impossible to assess safely in real world driving study. Eye tracking in driving simulator studies can also be used as an objective form of comparison with real world driving, enabling designers and engineers of the simulator system to assess whether the driving in the particular simulator indeed resembles real world driving, and whether simulator training indeed translates to real world benefits.

Likewise, eyetracking can be incorporated into other forms of MR simulators easily to help study human behaviours in other potentially hazardous situations. Below are some other examples where eye tracking is used in simulators for various other domains.

Pilot Training Simulator

Flight Control Simulator

Retail Environment Simulator

With the advent of new MR technology and systems, eye tracking can be a powerful tool that can be easily incorporated not just for scientific and market research but also to offer insights into system improvements for better experience.

As you may have known from reading the articles in our blog, eye tracking can be used in a wide variety of research. Check out Tobii Pro’s youtube channel, or continue reading our articles on this blog for more ways you can put your eye-trackers to good use!

If you are interested in how eye tracking can help you and your business, drop us a line at infosg@objectiveexperience.com or +65 67374511. The Future is Now.

 

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